Water Conservation Plan

The Water Conservation/Water Shortage Plan applies to all direct retail customer of Des Moines Water Works.  Municipal water systems and rural water systems that purchase water for resale are not subject to this plan, however, it is anticipated that all such municipal and rural systems will implement parallel water shortage plans which will result in reductions in demand similar to those described in the plan. To view the City of Waukee Water Conservation Plan click link.

The intent of Des Moines Water Works' Water Shortage Plan is to manage system demand so customers do not experience pressure, quality, or availability issues during periods of extreme water demand or during other times when water availability may be limited due to other events, such as raw water shortage, water quality events, or system failures.

The goal at each stage in the plan is to reduce system demands to 85% or less of the "Current Capacity" to produce safe drinking water, as defined in the plan.

Nominal capacity of the Des Moines Water Works system is 100 MGD.  Winter demand in a typical year averages approximately 40 MGD. Seasonal outdoor water use including moderate irrigation, increases demand to an average of approximately 60 MGD during the summer months. The majority of demand above 60 MGD is attributed to be irrigation.  Heavy irrigation causes spikes in demand which can reach more than 95 MGD.

Bason on historic consumption patterns, irrigation, primarily turf irrigation, accounts for as much as 40 MGD of demand during heavy irrigation periods. This, a 25% reduction in irrigation should result in a 10 MGD reduction in total demand to approximately 85 MGD, a reduction of more than 10% compared to peak demand otherwise expected.  This is the premise of Stage I. Stage I may be skipped if a water shortage occurs during a time of year when irrigation demand is not significant.

Based on historic consumption patterns, total outdoor water use accounts for as much as 50 MGD of demand during heavy irrigation events. Thus, a 50% reduction  in outdoor water use should result in a 25 MGD reduction in total demand to 70 MGD, a reduction of more than 25% compared to peak demand otherwise expected.  This is the premise of Stage II. Stage II may be skipped if a water shortage occurs during a time of year when outdoor water use is not significant.

Based on the foregoing analysis, that irrigation accounts for as much as 40 MGD of the demand during heavy irrigation periods, and understanding that the vast majority of this is turf irrigation, prohibiting turf irrigation should result in a 40 MGD reduction in total demand to approximately 55 MGD, a reduction of more than 40% compared to peak demand otherwise expected.  This is the premise of Stage III. State III may be skipped if a water shortage occurs during a time of year when irrigation demand is not significant.

Limiting consumption to a representative average of off peak months, plus or minus a small allowance, will result in a demand of approximately 40 MGD, a reduction of nearly 60% compared to peak consumption. This is the premise of Stage IV.

The stages of the plan are not necessarily consecutive.  When a water shortage occurs the stage deemed most appropriate for the conditions will be implemented.